SlickEdit is often featured in the news with highlights from product releases, accomplishments and awards. Learn what publications are saying about SlickEdit through the most recent industry articles and product reviews. Please contact us if you are interested in finding out more about SlickEdit and/or its products and services.
 

Review of Two Editors: Sublime Text 2 and SlickEdit on Dr. Dobb's
While IDEs are the predominant tools for coding and debugging in Java and .NET languages, many developers in other languages don't like the heaviness of a full IDE and prefer to work in an editor. Editors today are far more feature laden than their forebears, but still retain the familiar agility and quick response of earlier products. They exist in the space below IDEs and above simple text editors.
 
SlickEdit Review on LinuxJournal.com
For the minimalist programmer, there's vim. For everybody else, there's SlickEdit.
 
SlickEdit updates its namesake code editor by SD Times
SlickEdit, the venerable maker of source-code editors, has released SlickEdit 2012 with a retooling of its underlying user-interface technology, enhanced code beautification, and support for the Android SDK.
 
SlickEdit Review in Linux Journal's January Issue
In this review, I take a look at its features, and you can decide whether it's a text editor, IDE, or something in between.
 
Missing Vim in Eclipse? Try SlickEdit by DZone
I've been using Eclipse for years now, and like a lot of others, I find myself at home when using that standard editors. At the same time, I'm aware that there's a big portion of software developers out there that rather using Vim and such. And some people would rather you could do more when working on source code in Eclipse. Perhaps SlickEdit is what's missing from your setup. 
 
ComponentSource Bestselling Product Awards for 2009-2010
SlickEdit - Top 50 Bestselling Publisher Award 2009-2010
 
eWeek review of SlickEdit
SlickEdit 2009 packs enough new, productivity-boosting features to tempt developers to reconsider their tool preferences. 
 
Review of SlickEdit 2009 for Windows by David Bolton, About.com
Another year, another version. You may remember the review of SlickEdit 2007. Well not long ago, a new version was released and the makers haven't sat on their laurels. Rather than cover just the new features I've tried to cover the major features in this review to give an overall view.
 
Hey, Check Out My Slick New Editor!
When someone comes over to your cube and starts talking about the latest cool software, the last thing you would expect them to be excited about is a new text editor. I mean, who buys editors these days? If you want to get fancy-shmancy, you can download emacs—if you have the time to figure out how to install it and use it. Moreover, every Integrated Development Environment (IDE) these days has browsing functions, syntax highlighting, and so forth. Why would you really need more than that?
 
SlickEdit Tools for Visual Studio: Leverage Editing and Versioning Tools to Your Advantage
When I was approached to do the review on SlickEdit Tools for Visual Studio, I was a bit skeptical of the value of an editing package integrated in the Visual Studio IDE. I was wrong. I am currently working as a project manager. As such, I’m always looking to improve our company’s development process. This is a tool I think we can leverage to improve our process.
 
SlickEdit smoothes out code editor for Eclipse by SD Times
SlickEdit Core 3.4, released last week, is a plug-in for Eclipse that lets developers use the company’s code editor as a default editor in the Eclipse environment. Core gives users a set of symbols and navigation tools for editing code. It works with both Eclipse 3.3 and 3.4 and can handle more than 40 languages.
 
Ounce Labs' Partners With Industry-Leading Code Editor SlickEdit
Ounce Labs(TM), the leader in enterprise security source code analysis, today announced that the company is the first code analysis vendor to integrate SlickEdit Plug-in v3.2 for Eclipse into its advanced security source code analysis solution. As part of Ounce 6, the latest version of the company's flagship product, SlickEdit is integrated with Ounce Security Analyst.
 
Dobbs Code Talk review of SlickEdit 2008
I have been reviewing and using various versions of SlickEdit for years (visit my web site, www.mikeriley.com, for a list of my past articles and reviews) and was fortunate to be notified recently by the program's makers of their latest iteration, SlickEdit 2008. In my mind, SlickEdit has always been more than just a souped up code editor.
 
Tool Review: SlickEdit Tools
First off, I am going to tell on myself and admit that I have not yet dug my heels into ReSharper, SlickEdit, CodeRush, or any others that I maybe missing. I do know a lot about ReShaper’s functionality due to using IntelliJ in my short Java career, and as a result I figured SlickEdit was going to be “another refactoring add-in”. Instead, it turned out to occupy a completely different space of functionality. I don’t quite know how to explain the space of features that they occupy other than - it does everything else that ReSharper and VS.NET doesn’t.
 
SlickEdit - and Brief
I finished my two-week trial of SlickEdit and decided to buy it. $300 seems like a lot of money for a text editor, but the market for good ones is pretty small and those folks need to stay in business. The Brief emulation is great, and it’s got a bunch of really nice additional features that I never knew I wanted. There’s quite a learning curve, but if you’re writing code it’s worth spending a while to master it all.
 
SlickEdit 2008 is pretty... well... slick.
First of all, I wouldn't consider SlickEdit to be a competitor to Visual Studio. It's more of a multi-purpose polyglot programmer's editor on steroids. First, on install, it asks about your editing environment emulation. This is a great way to ease into SlickEdit from another editing environment (for me Visual Studio).
 
SlickEdit Tools for Visual Studio - Review
In all honesty, this review may be a bit premature. However, I wanted to record my thoughts and see if anyone listening shares them or has a difference of opinion. I've been evaluating the SlickEdit Tools and have come up with a few top picks. Also, I have identified some that make little difference to me. First of all, the Tools are segregated into two products: Editing Toolbox and Versioning Toolbox. I'll review them separately.
 
Slick Tools from SlickEdit
Over the last few weeks I've been using the new suite of tools from SlickEdit for Visual Studio. They are organized in two toolboxes, one for editing and one for version control. Installation into Visual Studio 2008 was smooth and painless. Installation into Visual Studio 2005 was not quite as smooth, but I've been using 2005 for fewer tasks since 2008 was released so I'm not really bothered by that. Your mileage may vary.
 
SlickEdit: A Review
I've been evaluating SlickEdit for awhile now, and wanted to see how it worked. In a word: wonderful! It's a good IDE, and does the job very well.
 
Code Annotations are a slick feature from SlickEdit Tools
One of the pretty slick (pun intended) features that comes with the SlickEdit Toobox is the ability to create Code Annotations. Think of Code Annotations as the 'ToDo' on Steroids.
 
Visual Studio Magazine: SlickEdit's Tools Editing Toolbox 2.0: An Editor Add-In for Power Programmers
SlickEdit's Tools Editing Toolbox v2.0 brings to Visual Studio some of the features that "power programmers" love about the SlickEdit editor. If you hate to take your hands off the keyboard and believe that real programmers don't use menus -- in other words, if pressing Ctrl+Shift+0 to navigate to the next method in your code makes sense to you -- then you're the audience that the Editing Toolbox is aimed at.
 
SlickEdit Tools mention at Ross Code
I love tools that'll help me be more productive, so I jumped at the chance. SlickEdit Tools is actually two products - Editing and Versioning. Both integrate with with Visual Studio, and since that's where I spend much of my time, that works for me.
 
Playing with SlickEdit
Being a tool geek I couldn't resist installing it and fooling around a bit. I've not spent a whole lot of time with the tools, but have already found some cool bits. The window below shows a cool documentation preview in MSDN style, a nice compliment to what I get from ReSharper's Ctrl-Q. There's also a nice regex evaluator which can generate code for you to paste in as needed
 
SlickEdit 2008 Review by Gamedev.net
SlickEdit is one of the longest-lived commercial text-editors around. Actually, there appear to be one or two circa-1990 commercial text editors out there that are still available for purchase (namely Brief), but they don't appear to have seen an update in a very long time. SlickEdit has, despite its very long pedigree and list of operating systems that have come and gone during its tenure, kept up fairly well with the times.
 
SlickEdit - Is there anything in there than VS hasn't got?
This question came across my blog, and I put it aside to think about it a bit because it's a good question. In my opinion, a code editor is one of the more personal things a developer uses. Sure we all have Visual Studio, and in today's version you can do tons of stuff with that thing. And... if you're just starting out, and VS is all you've seen, you probably would wonder why anyone would want more.
 
Eclipse Zone: Save Coding Time With SlickEdit Core for Eclipse
SlickEdit Core is a plug-in for Eclipse that allows developers to use the popular SlickEdit code editor as the default editor within the Eclipse environment.
 
SlickEdit update aims to reduce drudgery
It’s generally assumed that one can become more creative by minimizing the amount of repetitive drudgework, and developers insist that their text editing tools be both flexible and intelligent enough to handle chores that are easily automated.
 
SlickEdit Tools for Visual Studio
I'm a tools junkie! Anything that helps be work more efficiently is HUGE for me since every 10 minutes I can "save" in a day is 10 minutes with my Children, talking to my Wife, on my Harley, in the gym, etc..... I've been a Visual SlickEdit user for many years, you can set it up to look/work like Visual Studio and it has syntax highlighting for EVERYTHING (even stuff I've never heard of) and there are versions for Windows, Mac OSX, Linux, Solaris, AIX, HP-UX, etc.
 
SlickEdit Releases two new Toolboxes, the Editing and Versioning Toolboxes
Since I usually don't cover commercial products (besides Microsoft's :/ ) why am I posting on this? Am I just a huge sellout seeing that gave we some swag and free license keys? Na... Free stuff is free stuff. Freely given means freely used or freely discarded. Plus If I didn't like the product, even through it was free, I still wouldn't blog about it (I try to follow the thought philosophy that "if you can't say something nice, then don't say anything at all"... with varying degrees of success.) So since I'm blogging about this, I must have liked it? Yep, sure did.
 
SlickEdit Core 3.3, editor plugin for Eclipse first look by TheServerSide.com
Installation is very easy, using Eclipse' normal update facility. Just add http://www.slickedit.com/update/secore to the update manager as a remote server, add "SlickEdit Core" as the feature to install, and everything happens automatically. After installation, you'll be prompted through a registration wizard, and after it completes, SlickEdit Core will replace the Java editor in Eclipse as the default view.
 
Developer Life Review of SlickEdit
I write a lot of code in my work life, and I tend to work mostly with Java, and some PHP. I also have to work with CSS, XHTML, and XML quite frequently as part of doing my work. I’m always looking for products that will help me increase my productivity, since I have a very small company.
 
Unix Review: Examining SlickEdit: Code Quick | Think Slick (R)
If you look through the archives of UnixReview.com, you'll readily see that one of my favorite utilities is/was Visual SlickEdit. I first started using it with version 5, then was amazed each year when the version numbers incremented and the features multiplied.
 
Unix Review: Examining SlickEdit: Code Quick | Think Slick (R)
If you look through the archives of UnixReview.com, you'll readily see that one of my favorite utilities is/was Visual SlickEdit. I first started using it with version 5, then was amazed each year when the version numbers incremented and the features multiplied.
 
eWEEK: SlickEdit Gets Slicker
The company drops a new version of its popular code editor with a bunch of added features meant to help simplify developers' jobs.SlickEdit has announced the release of a new version of its eponymous code editor that delivers new features to help developers cut down on performing repetitive tasks.
 
Redmond Developer: Hands-On Review: SlickEdit 2007
One of the oldest alternative development environments, SlickEdit is a highly configurable tool that can match your development style on almost any platform, including Windows, Linux and Mac OS.